Welcoming Growth & Change + Northerly Park Explained – Part 3

Column 28 Published in the June 7, 2016 issue of the Warroad Pioneer

 

The growing season has arrived.

Our wily Angle kids will run free and far this summer. Barefoot and sun-freckled, they are trail-making, fort-building little workers who help hold up many a business around The Angle. They’ll grow in inches, confidence and a resourcefulness that child pavement pounders responsible only for their activity performance may never have the luxury of knowing.

Gardens are planted, flowers are on display and the smells of black dirt and freshly cut grass are a late-spring healing tonic all their own.

Business at The Angle is growing about as fast as my new basil plants.

Dahlia’s & Dirt, The Angle’s beautiful little greenhouse opened for its short season over the Memorial Day weekend. US-grown plants and soil aren’t allowed through the Canadian border, so we Angleites rely heavily on this little jem, now in its third year.

Long-time mechanical repair business D&S has sold to Jordan Story, a young hard-working Angle resident of five years and the great-grandson of Prothero’s Post owners Dale & Grace Prothero. He’s got Angle DNA in his blood, and the business, renamed Story’s Service and Storage, will offer service and storage, of course, and also parts, oil, batteries, boat detailing and a few items after Jordan’s own passions – Muskie tackle and premium coolers. They’ll also have an E-TEC diagnostics system up and running soon, which will save many distraught boat owners a dusty trip to town.

Oak Island Resort has new owners as well. Jenny and Kyle Kruidenier, whose family has been coming to The Angle for a combined thirty-odd years, just recently took the reins from Lori and Paul Jenson. The Krudienier’s are starting their first season this busy summer with a full book of business, and the community wishes them well.

New Flag Island Resort owners Andrea and Chuck Haggenmiller follow in the familial footsteps of many other family-run businesses here at The Angle.  After a winter full of adventures, they are well on their way to seasoned veteran status now in their second season.

I hope to profile some of our Angle newcomers in upcoming columns, giving them a proper meet and greet Angle Full of Grace style. *~*

This will be the last of my chatter about “Northerly Park” for a while. Now we wait. Within a month or two we’ll hear back from the Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails commission on the priority ranking, and if it’s what we hope then the real work begins. Here are the final two criteria applicants are asked to provide explaining how our park idea qualifies for regional designation and subsequent funding.

Criteria #3: Well-located to Serve a Regional Need and/or Tourist Destination

“Northerly Park” is exactly centrally located in Angle Inlet or “The Angle,” as it is known by the locals.  The park is at the intersection of two main roads; all vehicular traffic in and out of The Angle passes by the park.

Though The Angle is generally remote, according to the Lake of the Woods Tourism Bureau, $1.9M was spent on lodging at The Angle in 2015, which has an economic impact to the area in excess of $10M. This is an increase of 15% over 2014 lodging expenditures, which means The Angle is growing. There are currently 16 lodging facilities in The Angle but no public facilities whatsoever. Day-trip visitors can’t even use the restroom without walking into a bar or a resort lodge.

Keeping the park as Day-Use Only (at least in the beginning) would maintain no- to low-impact on the two neighboring resorts that offer minimal camping spaces.

A new airport is in pre-construction planning stages, which would add another port of entry to the NW Angle. Visitors arrive primarily by road and secondarily by boat across Lake of the Woods. It is a hugely popular snowmobiling destination and the park’s central trail would connect the groomed lake trails to the Outlying Area Reporting Station (OARS) and the southbound land trails.

Mostly, the area is in need of an iconic emblem within a representative environment that denotes arrival at the northernmost spot in the lower 48. GPS units put that spot out in the shallow, weedy waters of Angle Inlet Bay and the locals believe it is a rock on the far side of Magnuson Island. Regardless, it is either inaccessible or on private property. The observation tower, and “Northerly Park” as a whole, gives visitors the opportunity to “be” at that northernmost spot.

Criteria #4: Fills a Gap in Recreational Opportunity within the Region

The nearest park to The Angle is the Roseau City park, 67 miles away, and there are other regional parks near Warroad, MN, 73 miles away. A remote state park exists on Garden Island of Lake of the Woods and at Zipple Bay on the south shores of Lake of the Woods, 87 miles away.

Currently, there is no trail system in the area for walking, cross-country skiing or snowshoeing.  People utilize the main road, which is heavily traveled by vehicles towing boat and RV trailers.  All roads at The Angle are gravel with no sidewalks or side ATV trails, which poses a risk for pedestrians due to dust and flying rocks. The park would fill a huge safety gap for locals and resort goers who want outdoor exercise, bird watchers needing amenities, and winter sports enthusiasts needing a business-neutral warming location. It would also provide budget-conscious families with a public summer fishing spot and canoe access, something that does not currently exist at The Angle.

In the whole of the NW Angle, there exists one small educational or historical sign. The park would serve as an outdoor community museum of sorts, cataloging and documenting the varied and incredible history of this unique place.

 

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